Skip to content

Category: apartment

Looking for Affordable Apartments for Rent

Are you moving to a new city? If you are then, finding affordable apartments for rent is probably one of your priorities. You can choose from plenty of options in your search these days. Finding the right rental property may not be as difficult as you imagine.

Your income is the first thing that you should consider if you are looking for an apartment. It may be possible to seek help from organizations like HUD if you fall within a certain yearly income. You can benefit from the affordable apartments for rent for low income tenants that these groups offer.

Do you fall within the state guidelines of programs like HUD? If you do, then you should make sure that you take advantage of the opportunity to find affordable apartments for rent according to your income. These organizations work with your specific level of income so you will only pay what you can actually afford.

Asking questions from the people I knew was the first thing I did, when I was looking for affordable apartments for rent. This turned out to be one of the most valuable resources available. I was lucky to have friends and family members who were willing to help me find a place that I could afford on my meager waitress income. I have to say that I was shocked when I discovered many cheap, unadvertised apartments for rent in my area.

An unadvertised rental that was behind a private home was one of the nicest options available to me. I found a cozy one bedroom suite that was perfect for me in that small building. I almost fell in love with the place, even though it wasn’t one of the affordable apartments for rent that I put on my list. That wonderful apartment was just too far out of the way for me.

I had no choice but to try the other affordable apartments for rent on my list. I had my eye on a place that was located on a perfect location and I already knew the landlord. I talked to the owner and asked to be put on a waiting list because the current tenant was about to move. I would have never known that the apartment was going to be available if I hadn’t networked with friends and family.

You can also find affordable apartments for rent by searching the newspaper. However, shopping around might be a better option. It’s important that you become familiar with the neighborhood. It would also be wise to consider how far you want to drive to work each day. You can find the best cheap apartments for rent available by simply asking around.…

Comments closed

No Credit Check Apartments in Birmingham Alabama

First and foremost, know what you are getting into when you look for apartments for rent in Birmingham Alabama that do not require credit checks. You may have a valid reason for having bad credit, say, you’ve been through some rough times and are starting anew with a great new job in Birmingham. In any case, it will be naïve to think that landlords and apartment companies will take your word for it. They promised no credit checks to lure you in (yes, it’s an entire new niche market that is growing in this economy), but they will want to know that you aren’t just another habitual deadbeat who will eventually try to worm him/herself away from paying rent. There are many, many bad tenants making the rounds, and you will want to prove that although you don’t have a stellar credit rating, you will be a good, paying tenant. Another thing to consider is that if you do get a no credit check apartment, your neighbors may not be as upstanding as you.

Bring documents and be up front right at the start. Some apartments charge an application fee, so it might be good to talk to the management about your chances before paying up. Some of the smaller apartments will consider your case if you are nice to them and have complete documents like a bank statement, certificate of employment, or the like to prove you have income and can pay rent. Larger corporate run apartments are more regimented and have an established set of criteria, so the person you are pleading your case with might not have the power to approve you anyway. Another thing is to be prepared to pay cash upfront equal to a few months rent.

When you are ready, check out these Birmingham apartments that don’t require a credit check: Highland View Apartments on Aspen Drive, Highland Bluff Apartments on Robert Jemison Drive, Intown Suites (a sort of long-lease hotel which charges weekly)with branches in Huffman Road, Oxmoor Road, and Southpark Drive.

Visit apartments in Birmingham AL for more credit free apartments…

Comments closed

Apartments in Cleveland Ohio That Can Consider a Broken Lease

The artistic Cleveland, Ohio downtown area is rich in history, adventure and culture. This picturesque city located in the proximity of the Cuyahoga River, continues to attract droves of people who either simply come to visit, work or settle. There are also plenty of attractive riverside apartments for rent around the riverside section and also within the Cleveland environs and neighborhoods. But these apartments do conduct background checks not to mention checks on rental history and credit. This spells automatic denial for any customer who has a previous broken lease with other apartments. So are there any apartments in the Cleveland area that will consider a broken lease?

Neighborhoods In Cleveland With Second-Chance Apartments

Apartment complexes in the Cleveland area do routine checks. Many use a service called SafeRent which is a national database that houses tenants’ rental history information and any derogatory information that has been reported by previous apartments. A previous broken agreement, meaning the tenant walked out of a lease, is deemed very serious and can warrant immediate approval. Here are some neighborhoods that have apartments which will be willing to consider a broken agreement.

  • Downtown Cleveland
  • Buckeye-Shaker-Square
  • Central Cleveland
  • Collinwood
  • Corlett
  • Forest Hills
  • Union-Miles Park area
  • Woodland Hills

With second chance apartments that are willing to rent to individuals with an impaired rental background, the challenge becomes finding the exact apartments that are willing to take the risk. When it comes to the list of items considered non-negotiable, bankruptcy is the most serious followed by a broken lease.

To find places in Cleveland that are willing to take a chance with a tarnished rental record, an applicant must first of all check the Internet. The Web offers excellent opportunities to look for such complexes without having to leave one’s house. The challenge off course becomes that most of these types of apartments do not readily advertise because they do not want to attract negative publicity and also they want their rates to remain high. Bad publicity can drive rental rates down.

It is good to note here that even if you manage to locate these types of apartments, there are a few qualifiers that will be required. For instance, these apartments will be stringent on employment and income. One has to have been employed for at lease six months and be making almost 4 times the amount of the rent not to mention that the apartments will also conduct a criminal check.…

Comments closed

Renting in Tucson With Bad Credit

Tucson, Arizona’s second largest city, the home to University of Arizona, has a diverse population and culture. You have Native Americans, Mexicans, Spanish, and of course your good old westerners among the 541,811 Tucson citizens. You have attractions such as Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory. You could enjoy a ballet at the Tucson Music Hall or if you are in the mood for music, head to Tucson Convention Center or the Rialto Theater for a concert. There is much to do in Tucson and you would have a great time living here if you rent a Tucson, Arizona apartment.

When you search for a Tucson, Arizona apartment for rent it is taken for granted that you need a good credit record. Landlords and companies usually do a credit check before they let their apartments out and you would be demurred, if you don’t pass. So what do you do if you have a few bad marks in your credit record? Will you not get a Tucson apartment for rent at all? That is not so. There are means by which you can rent an apartment in the city even if you have bad credit.

If you know a person in Tucson who has good credit, and would agree to act as your guarantor, then you will have no problem finding a Tucson apartment for rent. This is what students usually do. Most real estate companies who are in the business would pass your application on the guarantee of a trustworthy Tucson citizen.

If you do not know anybody in the city, then your next option is to share your Tucson apartment with someone who has good credit. Since rental companies would pass your application if even one of you has a good credit record, you have a very good chance of finding your apartment. You could find advertisements for roommates in local newspapers such as Tucson Citizen, Tucson Post, or Tucson Weekly. You may also find advertisements online.

If you cannot find anyone to share with or you do not want to share your apartment, then, your third option is to try to find those apartments in Tucson that require no credit check. You will find their listings in Tucson newspapers and online too. Mostly, apartments that are let by individuals do not require credit check. As long as you have a decent income, have proof of income, and a few good referrals, you will be all right. You might try for condos let out by individual owners as well.

You could also try asking the rental agents to not do a credit check. There are many agents who allow it. You will have to pay a higher deposit for your Tucson apartment in return for their skipping the credit check. The owners, after all, would want to be sure that they get their rent. However, as long as you have good references and a decent income, and are willing to pay extra deposit, you should …

Comments closed

The Buying and Selling Costs of Real Estate Transactions in Kenya

As would be expected, there are several transactions involved in buying and selling property, which attract fees and taxes. In Kenya, you incur charges from the moment you begin searching for feasible investment ventures.

While some costs are set, such as registration and requisite search fees, many costs associated with buying and selling real estate in Kenya are highly variable and based on:

  • The type of real estate
  • Location of the property
  • Commissions and fees charged and earned by the various professionals (which are also often based on type and location of the property)
  • The type of transactions
  • Documents you want or need

The estimated sum for round trip transactions can range from 4.5% to 6.8% of the selling/buying price of the real estate.

Real-estate Agent Fees

  • Searching fees: rates vary depending on the type, size and cost of property with an urban apartment in upmarket neighborhood costing as much as Ksh5,000
  • Viewing fees: varies among real estate agents but usually ranges between Ksh500- 1000 for residential houses and over Kshs5,000 for commercial properties
  • Listing Fees: varies depending on size and location of property with landlords paying from 2% the value of the property
  • Agent’s commission (buyer & seller): 1.25% of the sale price

Property Requisite Search Fees

  • Preliminary requisite search fee: Ksh500
  • Costs of obtaining requisite completion documents (seller): Kshs500

Registration Costs

  • Registration fees: Ksh500
  • Banker’s cheque fee: Kshs600
  • Land rent clearance certificate: Kshs 7,500

Stamp Duties

Stamp duties are taxes tied to documents and real-estate sale/purchase transactions. It’s usually based on the sale price of the property.

  • Duly signed sales agreement: Ksh200 for original copy and Kshs20 for each copy
  • Property transfer (properties within municipalities): 4% flat rate
  • Property transfer (outside municipalities): 2% flat rate
  • Mortgage: 0.1% of the amount of mortgage
  • Property leased for less than 3 years: 1% flat rate
  • Property leased over a duration of 3yrs: 2% flat rate stamp duty

Taxes

  • Income tax (non-residents): 30% of gross rental income
  • Income tax (foreign companies): 37.50% flat rate
  • Annual property tax: varies across locations and property value but is usually 1% of the property value
  • Land tax: varies by location of the land and is most costly in major towns such as Nairobi with rates as high as 8%

Legal and Mortgage Fees

  • Legal charges related with taking mortgage
    • Depends on amount of mortgage you take (higher mortgages mean higher fees) but mostly the rates are between 0.5-1.5% of the value of property
  • Property insurance: varies with duration of loan repayment and lender
  • Mortgage life policy: charged at 0.3% and 0.6% of the mortgage loan per year
  • Mortgage negotiation fees: although it varies, most lenders ask for 1% of the mortgage amount
  • Mortgage indemnity insurance: often ranges between 5 – 10% of the value of property
  • Legal fees related with lawyer overseeing sale process: 1.5%

Other Important Costs

  • Survey fees: Ksh 5, 000 consultation fee.
    • Survey fees are determined by the survey work done
  • Valuation charges: usually Kshs5,000 consultation fee
    • However, the actual valuation fee depends
Comments closed

Real Estate Development Explained Easily

Many people familiar with the real estate market and industry are very familiar with the term “real estate developer,” and perhaps can even name a few famous ones, from Donald Trump to Alfred Taubman.  It would seem that the term itself is very self-explanatory, as real estate developer simply develops or improves real estate. 

In reality, the entire concept of realtor development is of course much more complicated than that.  Unlike someone that purchase a home to fix it up and resell it, a large-scale or high-end real estate developer often deals in millions or even billions of dollars in investment.

It’s true that a developer may be an individual, but more likely will be a partnership or Limited Liability Company, or even a corporation.

There are two major categories of real estate development activity:  land development and building development (also known as project development).

Land developers usually purchase land that is unimproved, meaning that it has yet to have utility connections, roads, any type of grading, and so on.  Unimproved means just that, in every case.

Developers then step in and define the “covenants,” which are the context of any future builds and improvements on the land.  They also gain “entitlements,” which are legal permissions or permits in order to go ahead with their development plans.  Once these covenants and entitlements are in place, the land development can then begin, with earth grading and other land leveling, utility connections, and zoning.  Roads are also planned, built, and paved, whether for large cities or just neighborhoods.

Once the land is properly developed, building developers may then step in.

These building developers then have buildings, whether offices, retail, or private homes, planned and built on the land. 

Building developers and land developers obviously need to work very closely, as the building developers plans will need to be accommodated by the land developers.  For example, the utilities brought in for office buildings are obviously different than those for private homes, as are roads, and everything else.

 Some building developers also purchase existing buildings or properties for the purpose of upgrading, remodeling, razing and rebuilding, or otherwise improving whether for sale, or to keep as assets to produce cash flow via rents and other means.

Why develop real estate?

When you really think about it, you realize the great amount of work and obvious risk that is involved in real estate development.  Additionally, homes or estates cost a lot of money to purchase and develop (sometimes called “hard costs”), and can sometimes be difficult to sell.  Because of these high expenses and difficult sales, and because the return on investment often takes some time, this explains the risk in ownership and development. 

So then why choose this as an occupation?  One thing to remember is that most real estate development projects are financed with debt leverage, that is, with borrowed funds the proceeds of which are assumed to earn a greater rate of return than the cost of interest.

By using debt leverage …

Comments closed

How to Obtain Title For Abandoned Real Estate Through Adverse Possession in the State of California

What is Adverse Possession? How can I obtain title to real estate?

In a nutshell adverse possession is a process where a person or an investor can obtain the ownership or title of real property from another person because the owner has abandoned the property. This is done by simply taking possession of that property in the manner prescribed by state law.

In doing so, you can, literally acquire ownership or title of the real property for just paying the back delinquent real estate taxes and the cost to file a quiet title lawsuit establishing that you obtained title to the property through adverse possession. In other words, you can take title of valuable property for a incredible discount.

The Law of Adverse Possession

The laws governing adverse possession is local state (or, in Canada, territorial law); consequently an Abandoned property investor must look into the specific laws of a specific state or Canadian territory where the real property is located. Since the laws are different dramatically from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and can often be confusing, anyone wishing to take title to real property through adverse possession should contact a knowledgeable attorney before attempting to do so.

In order for you to begin understanding the requirements of Adverse Possession let’s look at a specific example. Below is a closer look at th California Adverse Possession law. We will use this law to identify and explain some of the more common terms used in Adverse Possession.

California Adverse Possession Law

Briefly, California state law states that Real Estate investors wanting to obtain title to another person’s real property through adverse possession MUST satisfy all the following Requirements:

1.That the Abandoned property investor’s possession was held under either (1) a claim of right or (2) under color of title:

2.That the Abandoned property investor’s possession was actual, open and notorious;

3.That the Abandoned property investor’s possession was hostile, adverse an exclusive;

4.That the Abandoned property investor’s possession was continuous and uninterrupted for a period of five years;

5.That the Abandoned property investor paid th real property taxes during that five-year period.

Possession must be held under either (1) a claim of right or (2) under color of title.

The California statutes governing adverse possession and as well as the statutes of most other states make a distinction between claiming adverse possession based upon a “claim of title founded upon a written instrument or judgment or decree” (often referred to as a claim under color title) and claiming adverse possession based upon “a claim of title exclusive of any other right, but not founded upon a written instrument, judgement, or decree” (often referred to as a claim as either a claim of right, see California Code of civil procedures Section 322 and 323. As to such claim under claim o right, see Code of Civil Procedures Section 324 and 325.

Basically a claim of adverse possession based upon color color of title is one where the claimant(Abandoned Property Investor) took in good faith …

Comments closed

Investing In Real Estate For Beginners: Apartment Complexes

Here is some advice for investing in real estate for beginners who are thinking about investing in apartment complexes. Many commercial property advisors with an opinion say that apartment complexes with over 150 units are the properties to buy, it’s not necessarily true. Multifamily units are indeed a solid investment. However, what you really want to invest in is where you can earn the most rent per unit. Often that is in multifamily complexes with less than 100 units.

When you are making a purchase bid for a large complex, you are often bidding against financial institutions with deep pockets. This creates two distinct disadvantages for you as a beginning investor.

First, most beginner commercial investors are forced to join a large consortium of other investors to get in on a multi-million dollar deal. This dilutes your ownership interest and the weight your opinion counts when issues arise such as when to sell.

Second, when you and your investors are bidding with the last dollars that you have to invest, the large institution can easily out bid you by several thousand more than you can raise. Going up against large institutional investors can be overwhelming.

There are many other reasons to invest in complexes with less than 125 units:

A. There is less upkeep and maintenance. You may be able to avoid the added expense of an on-site manager and full-time maintenance crew.

B. There are more medium-size complexes available at any given moment. That means less competition from other investors and more opportunity to find one with exceptional cash flow.

C. Cash on cash returns for medium complexes are frequently better than for large complexes as you are able to offer a wide variety of amenities and services.

D. You will not be dealing with a financial institution as the seller with a cumbersome sale policy. The seller will more likely be an individual or small partnership that can provide flexible sales terms if they choose.

E. They typically will require less equity to acquire. This means you can control the property as an individual or with a couple of partners. You thus own a higher percentage of the property and thus a bigger amount of the profits.

F. Often the less knowledgeable seller has avoided raising rents because they have become friendly with the tenants or they are afraid the vacancy rate will increase. By studying the local market rents and vacancy rates, you could find that you can immediately increase cash flow through rent increases.

There are some very good arguments to owning small apartment complexes in the 4 to 12 unit range. This can be a good start if you personally manage them and perform most of the maintenance. However, this size complex seldom generates enough income to leave a profit when a property management company is hired.

Investing for beginners can begin with small complexes and once the income is stabilized buy another. After a couple of years, you will have 3 or 4 small …

Comments closed

Making the Transition From an Apartment to Your First Home

Between myself and my real estate team, we have worked with several first time home buyers we have had several times where a first time homebuyer was moving from an apartment complex and into their first home.

We found that this transition in real terms is not that big of a deal, however it is the sentimental, emotional, and financial part of the transition that can have the biggest effect on a first time homebuyer. In other words, first time homebuyers that have been renting in the years leading up to the purchase of their first home have, on average, moved a half dozen times before the move into their first new home. The average age of a homebuyer is 32, and i can remember making at least 5 times before planting down in my first place. Point being, its not the actual move that causes the fear or the challenge in the moving transition; we have found that its all inside the buyer’s head.

With that said, the biggest change for a first time homebuyer will be the emotional and financial changes that occur through the process of buying one’s first home. Most notably, in most cases, a buyer’s monthly payment will go up compared to the rent that they were paying. Also, renters are used to calling the landlord when something breaks in the place that they are renting. For a first time homebuyer, something we do with our initial consultation is set expectations and try to ease the “sticker shock” for a first time homebuyer. We do this by encouraging the buyer to “pretend” to make his or her would-be payments so that they can get a feel for it and not get all stressed out the first month they move in. I’ve found that this fear of a higher monthly payment is all inside your head. Many buyers initially fear the higher payment, and sometimes it is a deterrent from buying a home in the first place, but I’ve found that all buyers get used to their new payment and make it a part of their lives and adapt and adjust their finances accordingly. A buyer gets qualified for a home loan, so the bank is taking a statistical bet that the buyer will be able to handle the payments, and i tend to agree with them on this as well.

However, a buyer can get over this financial concern by making the “pretend” payment; for example, if rent is $1500 a month, but the new mortgage is going to be around $2200 a month, then make the rental payment, and throw $700 into a savings account every month leading up to your home purchase. For some buyers who are buying a short sale, this may entail more than a few months of saving, which is even better and directly addresses the second most common concern about the home-purchase transition for a new buyer which is maintaining and taking care of the home they just bought.…

Comments closed

New Jersey Penalties and Consequences For Failure to Comply With Apartment Registration Requirements

In today’s article, we will discuss the importance of two separate documents required for landlords of residential real estate.

Certificates of Occupancy

The first document is the Certificate of Occupancy. The vast majority of municipalities in the State of New Jersey require that the landlord obtain a new Certificate of Occupancy each time a new tenant moves in. Inspections that accompany the application for a certificate of occupancy vary by municipality. All towns will check the smoke detectors, and if there is gas heating, there will also be a check of the carbon monoxide detector. Some towns will also conduct much more thorough examinations in an attempt to increase the quality of housing throughout the town. It should be noted that it is no longer permissible for a municipality to require a new certificate of occupancy inspection when a family expands by natural means (e.g.; the birth of a new child).

While most landlords are vaguely familiar with the fines which the municipality may impose upon them for failing to obtain a certificate of occupancy, few are familiar with the far more severe consequences which can result from such failure. Where certificates of occupancy are required, a home rented without a certificate of occupancy constitutes an illegal contract. Hence, in the matter of Khoudary v. Salem Board of Social Services, 260 N.J.S. 79 (App. Div. 1992), the Court determined that a landlord who rents without a certificate of occupancy is without authority to file a suit for rents.

In essence, what the Khoudary Court said was that it would not help the landlord enforce an illegal contract. In the event that the tenant vacates the premises owing rents, either for prior months or months that may become due under the unexpired lease, the landlord may not file an action to collect the rents, and furthermore, may not apply any of the tenant’s security deposit toward these rents. The landlord can still bring an action or withhold security for tort damages, such as destruction of the apartment. It remains uncertain whether a Court should allow a tenant to file an action for return of all rents previously paid under the illegal contract; however, most Courts will rule that the tenant should pay for the quantum meruit benefit of the use of the apartment.

For nearly a decade, Courts interpreted the ruling in Khoudary to mean that failure to obtain a Certificate of Occupancy was a bar to eviction. However, this issue has been since clarified. In the matter of McQueen v. Brown and Cook, 342 NJS 120 (App. Div. 2001), the Court ruled that while failure to obtain a certificate of occupancy rendered the contract illegal, the landlord still maintained the right to evict the tenant. Essentially, the Court’s decision holds that a tenant should not be able to benefit from the illegal contract, and furthermore, it is clear that leaving the tenant in the illegal rental would be contrary to public policy.

Landlord Registration Statement

While failure to obtain a …

Comments closed